Innovation in Healthcare has a Home in Cleveland

May 21, 2015, 9:00 am

By Jordan Manser, Technical Writer

Over the past several years, there has been a dynamic shift in the types of medical devices found within hospitals. Advancements in technology and government incentives have driven the adoption of wireless connectivity into these devices. ‘Connected Hospitals’ are fully integrated and allow caregivers and patients to roam throughout the hospital while providing accurate and timely monitoring. In a fully connected hospital, caregivers can focus on providing the best quality of care to their patients, instead of on administrative tasks. Wireless medical devices, such as tablets, infusion pumps, hospital beds, and body-worn patient monitors are constantly on the move, requiring a consistent, robust connection. With critical data transferred on a daily basis to Electronic Health Records (EHR), such as confidential patient records and billing information, it is crucial that each data packet is received and not lost in the burgeoning flow of medical data.

In thGlobal Center Lobbye next few years, nurse shortages and an increased number of patients is expected, making the gained efficiencies of wireless technology crucial to providing quality patient care. Wireless technology won’t just be used to connect existing medical devices; entire new waves of medical devices are being created to take advantage of the connectivity that wireless technology provides. Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS) quickly find usable equipment for treatments. Advanced bed and fall monitors can monitor patient movements and alert staff as soon as there is an issue. Mobile medical devices allow patients to take home their medical devices so they can be monitored even after they leave the hospital.

  • Health and Home
  • People, Patients and Caregivers
  • Clinical Spaces
  • Healthcare Information and Technology

GlobalCenter1The center is supported by several industry leaders including GE Healthcare Systems, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland Clinic, HIMSS, Cisco Systems, Johnson & Johnson, Siemens, Forbo and Cardinal Health, to name a few. While touring the center, Dave Johnson, Director of Sales and Marketing, stressed that one of the driving factors of the center is to improve patient outcomes and decrease costs for both patients and hospitals.

The Global Center is located in the heart of downtown Cleveland, Ohio and is currently open to the public with free admission. Check out the latest in medical technology from leading organizations in healthcare. For more information about the Global Center for Health Innovation click, here.

To learn more about wireless in hospitals, check out the Connected Hospital webpage.

 

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